Friday, July 8, 2011

Wrench Stole my Muse


Wrench Stole my Muse, inktense pencils on w/c paper, 18x24
Thursday is Art-at-the-Y day and I had nothing in mind.  I remembered that a heavy wrench from the thrift shop had been riding in my back seat for a couple of weeks.  I grabbed the manikin and set this up on a cardboard box--lighting at the Y is not good.

The manikin was a gift from my neighbor Carol--it had belonged to her late husband Lamar.  Lamar was a saxophonist/choreographer/dancer/artist/human resources director/sociologist/truck driver/motorcycle rider.... and the best story teller I've ever met.  He would have liked this drawing.  His manikin usually sits atop the bookcase in my living room, always in a dance pose.

This needs a bit more work.  

22 comments:

  1. You're continuing in your inimitable style, meaning, no one has ever even come close. If this manikin was one of Lamar's props, you're certainly giving him his props with this drawing. I won't ask you what you were doing driving around with this weapon on your backseat, but I bet Lamar could tell a great story about it.

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  2. Hi SamArtDog. My thrift-shop buys often stay in the car until I can sneak them into the house. You just never know, though, when a big wrench might come in handy. Lamar used this manikin when he was taking an art class, and he had a love of old tools and trucks and cars (Carol's still clearing the garage). He was a great porch sitter--about five years now since his sudden death one Monday morning. Great human that he was--an organ donor--he lives on.

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  3. I agree with Sam, your work is so unique...there is no one like you! I like how I can look at anything you do and come up with my own story about it. This makes me think of "wrenched" feelings...and it is so much more interesting to look at a painting like this one instead of a "bowl of fruit" painting. I think here that mannequin is not fighting it's plight...but s/he'll be glad to be returned to the dance pose.

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  4. Oh I do love this one and especially spark to the humor of the piece. Lamar sounds like he was a wonderful man. Maybe I need a mannequin. I sure could use a muse! LOL

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  5. Your paintings/artworks always have a humoristic side to them, I guess it is your trademark, a wonderful one.
    I wonder how you get the ideas, really original and personal, I am in awe.
    Wishing you a wonderful summer Hallie, I am leaving for two months, but will keep up whenever possible. xox

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  6. Great drawing, Hallie. Such a good story just looking at this one and deciding what it's all about :) I think your neighbor's husband would be smiling now!

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  7. Your art always makes me smile, Hallie. And you are always so interesting, the casual way you explain each piece you do.

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  8. Thank you Celeste. I think this drawing had many sources--I've felt wrenched during the last month; Lamar was wrenched from life, I need an excuse for buying junk, etc. Also, it's hot and buggy outside--no plein air for me. Mannequin/manikin; I couldn't decide which spelling to use.


    Hi AutumnLeaves. I have several mannequins in my workshop--they look out windows or are made to stand in corners. This is the first time I've actually used one in drawing; I think of them as decorative or as toys.

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  9. Thank you Jane. I grew up in a family that could usually find humor in most situations. I like studying how things are put together and that sometimes leads to drawing them; it's not until half-way through that I realize the connections and story (intuition, I guess). Have a great summer--I'm sure you'll have some great paintings.


    Hi RHCarpenter (Rhonda). Yes, Carol said Lamar would approve. It would be interesting to know what others see in this drawing.


    Thank you Robin. I think my art shows that I'm a clutter collector. I never pitch anything--and I buy more. Using it in a drawing justifies the purchase.

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  10. That may be the same wrench that stole my beige purse.

    Everett T. McGill

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  11. Mr. McGill--don't mess with the wrench; he knows where you live.

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  12. Bad wrench! You'e sense of humour comes through in your art. It always makes your art interesting. I too was raised in a family that laughed a lot. Sometimes a bit too wildly for my grandfather's liking!

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  13. Hi Carole. Humor helps but it's not always easy to find.

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  14. Yes, Hallie, I'd have to agree.

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  15. Hallie,
    I love your take on things. Who else would solve this immediate problem in this way? It makes interesting content. Hope you're enjoying the summer season.

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  16. Classic, CLASSIC Farber. Damn woman- you are one helluva artist.
    Humor dances the line between pain, sorrow and joy. I think that quality attracts us to humor- it allows us to look at our existence and face it head on.
    Sometimes in life, the joke is on us. And then if we are lucky, we learn to laugh at ourselves- a gift and an art of living.
    I love your work Hallie. I am a fan through and through.

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  17. Hi Margaret. It's sometimes advantageous to have a collection of clutter--something interesting is usually lying around (maybe for years). I enjoy reading about your summer.


    Hello Pam. Damn--you can really read between the lines. I looked at this a few days ago; it probably says a lot about my frustration at lack of energy during the past couple of months. I wasn't up to throwing things and cussing; instead, I drew a mannequin being dragged through life--after I had dragged myself to art-at-the-Y. I'm feeling better--a prescription for potassium helped, and humor always helps. Thanks for commenting.

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  18. You are the master of concepts! What an original idea, again fraught with all kinds of implications to the imaginative non-tired mind (and mine is neither at the moment). I think it is well-done, and wonder why it is unfinished. If you do more to it, I'd be interested to see it.

    And how did I miss the last post! Great tree. I photographed a tree the other day for the same reason, so full of interest.

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  19. Thank you, thank you, Dan. You cannot ever call yourself unimaginative. I just need to clean up some pencil marks, add shadow at the base of the wrench, and I missed coloring a couple of "joint balls"--nothing major.

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  20. And Dan--I look forward to seeing your tree. I imagine that it's one of those Florida trees that's all gnarly and long lived.

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  21. Another unique Hallie Farber piece. I love it. Sometimes I feel like my foot is caught in a wrench when doing my art. I have something to say, but I'm stuck!

    Back from world travels and now I intend to get caught up with my art blog friends.

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  22. Hi Mary. Welcome back. Following your bike trip up the East Coast was the most interesting part of my summer. You and Bob are great travelers--prepared for anything.

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