Sunday, February 12, 2012

On My Easel

Title not yet chosen, 20x16 cradled panel
I've been working on this oil painting for a couple of weeks; I'm as slow as molasses in February.   Mostly, I sit in my comfortable chair and wonder what to do next--and I've eaten all the snacks that were stashed in the workshop.

Of course, there will be a logical (to me) explanation of this when I post the finished painting. 
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38 comments:

  1. It's good to see your new easel at work. I'm really excited with what's happening here and look forward to the finished painting.

    -Don

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  2. I like it,
    Its got my attention
    would be interested in
    the story behind the
    the construction

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  3. What a fabulously interesting composition, Hallie! It looks to be coming along beautifully too. My mom always used to say "slow as molasses in January," something I now say myself.

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  4. very beautiful.
    Ciao from Italy
    http://evelin-capici.blogspot.com/

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  5. You need to restock the snacks in the workshop! Did you work from a photograph? it looks like you are getting ready to share a dreamlike experience? I am anxious to hear your logic, looking forward to the finished work.

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  6. oops... I see the photo on the easel, so disregard my previous question. I am curious about the (is it a swan?) over your shoulder...

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  7. Well, a title doesn't come to mind, but this is a fascinating painting - I keep wanting to create a storyline for it (which is a good thing because it means you've captured my imagination with this one). Is that a piano the large russet bird (swan? goose?) is sitting on? A bit surreal :)

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  8. Hi Don. The easel doesn't get used as often in cold weather--I have to remember to turn on the heat and warm up the workshop first. No spur-of-the-moment working out there.

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  9. Thank you Santastu. You have an interesting blog--stilettos? One could break an ankle (or hip).

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  10. CrimsonLeaves--you're right; it's January. I changed the saying slightly because it was warm here last month--now February is downright cold.


    Evelin, Thank you. Andd thanks for the link.

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  11. Hi Robin. I will restock the snacks; and I usually fill my pockets with treats as I walk out my back door. This started with an old b&w piano recital photo.


    Hi RH (Rhonda). I can't decide--swan/goose or snail/snake. Many titles come to mind; it depends or where I call it finished.

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  12. Dear Hallie. As always your artwork is not only beautiful but also interesting and original. You are totally your own ( danish expression that I hope makes sense to you ). xox

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  13. 1. I love the movement in the background and the stillness of the woman
    and the piano.
    2. Can't wait to hear your logical explanation!
    3. Love you easel.
    4. stashing snacks in the studio is a great idea

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  14. Oh man, I just found your blog was lost from my blog list. It is now found again and back on my blog list on my blog. How does that happen?

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  15. Story or title... you are totally on your own here. Of course, writing down the whys and/or wherefores will require as much talent as the painting demonstrates. In other words, you've got your work cut out for you.

    Should take a fair amount of snacking. What's your preferred fuel?

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  16. Jane, thank you. I do understand being totally my own. I think that may be true of most painters, certainly of you.

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  17. Hi Carole. I was attempting to make the background solid--the paint and brushes had a mind of their own and I'll probably leave it that way. When I go to the workshop, I usually stay for 4 or 5 hours--snacks are necessary.

    Sounds like the blog ghost was at work.

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  18. SamArtDog--now I'm afraid the explanation will be boring.

    My snacks include (but are not limited to): Peanuts, granola mixed with berries/nuts/frosted miniwheats, Planters Nut-rition bars (which are made of nuts and chocolate), wahsed down with bottled water. When I've gained three pounds, I know the painting's finished.

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  19. Hallie, you are great at making luscious curves. I love the way the bird curves over the woman and the strokes in the background also curve. Rather Van Gogh.

    My first thought was "Swan Song." My second thought was, "How can I become this creative?!"

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  20. Thanks Mary. My thought is "How can Mary have 49 recent paintings ready to hang in her one-person show?" That would take me about ten years.

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  21. I like this already. It's not the cold but darkness that stops me painting before April! Kudos for braving the elements.

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  22. Hi Mark. Maybe the darkness is a gift--it encourages you to write poems, create books and scripts, and compose music. You do it all!

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  23. I've wanted to comment since you've posted but I've had little to no v free time on the computer and I hate trying to comment from my phone. Here I am doing just that. This piece is classic Hallie, interesting, mysterious. I love the disparate elements. Neat seeing it on the easel too.

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  24. Hi Dan and thanks for commenting. On the phone? Wow. I only know how to turn mine on and make a call--don't know which button I'd push to answer a call. I haven't had a chance to get back to this painting since I posted--regular boring life sometimes gets in the way. (Disparate?--Everything and everyone's connected.)

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  25. You are a surrealist in the tradition of Frida. This is a truly bizarre, quirky painting. Is it a swan? Is it a dinosaur bird ancestor? And what is it doing on the piano? Oh I love quirky! You go girl!

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  26. Ah, Davida. I couldn't figure out why I liked this weird bird--maybe I was remembering the ancestors.

    As I worked with these water soluble oils, I thought of you and wondered how the heck you make it seem so easy!

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  27. Ahhhh....a new painting! Like the other commenters, I am so intrigued by the "big bird". The big bird has something of a loch ness monster quality...and like "nessie" it seems (to me) both ominous AND friendly (!) This is what I LOVE so much about your work...we (the viewer) always get so much to ponder. I'm looking forward to your write up on this painting! (p.s. was the photo you are working from taken at a wedding?)

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  28. Thanks Celeste. I haven't had a chunk of time to finish the painting yet, so I've worked on small watercolors here in the house. The photo is of me at a piano recital eons ago--I'll bet you took lessons, also.

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  29. hmmm...very provocative beginning...

    I do believe we are getting some warmer weather here in Virginia later this week...perhaps you'll restock the snack larder and hang out a bit more in the workshop...
    I can't wait to see how this develops.

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  30. Fascinating image, especially when taken with Bugged. Is it Leda and the Swan, a visit form Zeus whispering creation in your ear? Or is the serpent in the garden of your home whispering untruths? The bug too seems to be talking in the woman's ear.

    These are primal, non-mammalian lifeforms. Are they the R-complex (reptilian brain ganglia) talking? (www.eruptingmind.com/beating-the-reptilian-brain/).

    They are talking to the figure of a woman who has on all her social armour of hairdo, clothes and poise. They are talking to a woman's persona. Maybe they are asking her a question. Armour ... or prison?

    But i ramble.

    Obviously an arresting and thought provoking work, an image that will stay in my mind, Hallie, as the best art tends to do.

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  31. Hi Donna. I have restocked but haven't found that chunk of time yet. Life intrudes.

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  32. Hi Harry. A few days ago I was looking through an old book about Sister Wendy and came across Leda and the Swan. I know the painting but didn't think about it when I was working. I thought, "Oh, no"--then I thought, "Well, my kids are okay."

    The reptilian brain is interesting (thanks for the link). I think mine takes over only when someone is popping gum; the intermittant noise makes me shaky and I can think of nothing else. I usually leave rather than punch. Noises--snoring, leaky faucets, gum-popping--have always driven me nuts; I'm guessing my feeling is close to road rage. Now I'll blame my first brain (which probably has much more power than I think).

    Armour or prison--good question. Could be both.

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  33. just noticed your new photo on blogger, and now I see a little facelift on your blog.... fun fun fun!

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  34. Hi Robin. I haven't been able to spend time in the workshop so I was messing around on the computer--thought it was time for a change. Photo was taken from a distance, so it's not toooooo bad.

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  35. Hahaha, you're smile is contagious!

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  36. love the changes to your blog...and your new profile photo! nice!

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  37. I am always intrigued with your subject matter and admire your ability to tackle these paintings. I'm looking forward to reading the title you decide on.

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