Saturday, January 22, 2011

The Fisherman that Got Away

Fisherman Unknown, inktense pencils & pen on hot press w/c paper, 10 x 14


I live on 50,000-acre Buggs Island Lake here in Southern Virginia (called Kerr Lake in NC).  Fishing and fishing tournaments are popular.  Five years ago I saw two photos on a local site, printed them out, and naively thought I'd run into this fisherman and ask permission to do a painting of the other photo--one of him and his friend in a boat near a tree-lined shore--holding a 50/60-pound catfish.  No such luck so no such painting.  Most of the photos on the site are of gigantic fish (I think this one was posted as a joke).


Who's the Fairest?, pencil & ink on hot press w/c paper,  12 x 10
I wonder which came first in Holland--windmills or tulips?  I find aging tulips more interesting than those in their prime (this photo was taken by my son).  Age has been on my mind this week.  I was at President Kennedy's inaugural parade fifty years ago; I was eighteen and remember being on Pennsylvania Avenue climbing on piles of snow--wearing high heels, no hat, and no gloves.  As a Southerner I was not prepared for DC's sometimes harsh winters--I learned.

I recently finished reading Egon Schiele, a book discussed on RHCarpenter's blog.  I'm still looking at his drawings, watercolors, and oils; I especially liked his line drawings.  However, I still draw the same way I've been drawing since elementary school--use whatever's handy and add a black outline if I'm so inclined.

30 comments:

  1. The fish caught a big fisherman! These are both great! Your color is so subtle and well-done in the first one. Your aging tulip is much more high key, and I love it - you're right this is very interesting, - really great!

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  2. Hallie- Just when I think I "know" your art- you surprise. I LOVE that about you.
    The fisherman looks like someone I've met and you've drawn him in such great realism. That takes talent and probably is why your more abstract style portraits are so good. (I've learned that the skill is connected.)
    The aging tulips are gorgeous and I'm not accustomed to seeing this style from you. I'm sure it's not unusual for you- I just haven't seen it. I really love the pencil and ink. What kind of ink do you use? Do you use a pen or brush?
    Thanks for the inspiration. Your art KICKS ME IN THE ARSE!!! (That's good.)

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  3. Hi Dan. Thanks. The fish seemed smaller in the photo--I think the hands should have been drawn larger. Only a few fingers were visible in the photo. I like this high-key tulip; I might paint it.


    Hi Pam. I think realism comes first but I think it comes from interest and really looking--not talent. I do draw some strange-looking flowers and birds--usually small and on scrap paper. I think I used everything in my satchel for the tulip--all types of pencils, crayola brush pens, a micron pen, a BIC marker, a G2Gel pen--anything handy. I wanted intensity; I think I got it. (I also cropped 2 inches from the top because I splotched some walnut ink onto the drawing. I had a choice--crop it or have a bomb falling out of the sky.)

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  4. Did we just cross over into Pisces or something? There seem to be fish stories everywhere. Yours is a good'un.

    I think tulips are the best right before they drop petals and become onelip. Your black outline appeals to the graphic in me.

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  5. Hi SamArtDog. Maybe, thanks to Ophiuchus, we entered Pisces earlier this year. And, you probably got your fish stories from Hawaii (lucky you). I'll keep an eye out for a onelip--don't have a photo; I might have to buy a tulip and wait. What's with hard edges and soft edges? Save time with black outlines--I like them (sometimes).

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  6. Love these pieces. You are soooo talented!

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  7. Thanks Eva. I'm waiting to see your journal.

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  8. Hi Hallie, Hmmm, you mean you resisted having a bomb drop on your tulip? Wouldn't that change meaning! I do like the design of you tulip and the fish is superbly humorous. I agree with you; I liked reading Egon Schiele.

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  9. Aren't we lucky, you and I...that we remember JFK..the real live one--the one with the movie star smile and the amazing wit? His press conferences were like comedy central. I liked your description of the cold. Wasn't it wonderful how he wore no hat? You "matched" him that day, in that way. I very much admire both of your pieces. The fisherman shows your whimsical side and the tulip is more serious. Aging, decay and destruction...those are things I've been thinking about too. I wish I could like and accept my wrinkles (I don't!) ...but I AM glad I remember "Camelot"..and you have to be of a certain age to have that be so. :)

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  10. Nice!!
    I guess those fishermen were "the ones that got away" excuse the cliche.
    the look on his face... not sure if he's proud or dejected

    a southern gal should know, when dealing with northern weather... all bets are off

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  11. I love the fisherman's perspective looking down, and seeing his huge hands on the fish. What fun new stuff!

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  12. Hi Peggy. I did think about the bomb--couldn't come up with a reason to take out an almost--dead flower. I will try some line drawings Schiele-style; I'm looking for my China markers.


    Hi Celeste. I remember that Inaugural Day as if it were yesterday (I think). I was shocked when all the news stations mentioned 50 years ago! Then they interviewed officials who had been attendance--they were really old. (ha) It was an interesting time, being single and in the big city.


    Hi JB. I think this fisherman was being funny--all his other photos include BIG fish. These days, all weather bets are off no matter where you live.


    Hi Robin. I have to give credit to the photographer (whoever he is) for that perspective--that's what I liked about the photo. These were fun.

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  13. I love tulips, and i agree with you ...they get more interesting as time passes by...irresistible when they start to open and fall down on the vase. Yours is a beautiful example of an "aging" tulip.
    Like your proud and somewhat incredulous fisherman, too!

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  14. Thank you Jane. I've never planted tulips, but I like them now. I have to admit that I thought they were rather boring (I like daffodils and irises in the Spring) until I saw my son's photos. There was a strength in this one tulip standing tall while drooping.

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  15. Hallie! I always look forward to seeing your next art. It's wonderful to see someone doing what they love and doing it to perfection.

    To answer your tulip question: It was the windmills that came first. The first tulip bulb imported to the Netherlands at great expense was almost eaten by someone who thought it was some sort of onion!

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  16. Good Morning, MM, and thank you. I'd like to think the Dutch imported tulips because they look a lot like windmills as they age.

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  17. Still lovin' your sense of humor and your art.

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  18. Hi Sue. Humor gets me through life; art gives me a reason to hang in there.

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  19. Spring is on it's way, maybe, in my part of the world. The snowdrops are popping out now and the 50 plus tulips I planted last year will be out in a month or so. Tulips come in such wonderful colours as shown in your drawing, which is beautiful by the way. You captured the fisherman perfectly!

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  20. Hi Carole and thank you. I thought you lived in a cold climate so I just googled Vancouver Island and Victoria--sounds like a beautiful place to live. I imagine your garden is as picturesque as your studio. Daffodils are popping up hap-hazardly in my yard; irises and daylilys will be next.

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  21. Hallie, I love the humor in your fisherman, and I agree that these aging tulips are far more interesting than some in their prime. I like the bold colors.

    Like you, I keep getting reminded of age lately. I remember the Kennedy days well, such an interesting time. I was in college and single -- good years with some sad events. The tulip speaks for us who are in our later years.

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  22. Hi Mary. I just can't see a bike-ride-up-the-East Coast, round-the-world traveler, painter, and event coordinator as a drooping tulip! The 60s were an interesting time but I think I like my older self better (and the shoes are more comfortable).

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  23. Hi Hallie--Fantastic writing--you've had me in stitches all morning. Hilarious. And that fisherman looks so serious. He seems to be saying, "This here's the most expensive fish in the world--35k including the boat." It's like looking into a mirror. I've got to lighten up. Thanks again. Wm

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  24. Welcome, Wm Cook. You're right--the fishermen have the expensive boats and BIG trucks. I looked at your blog and will visit later. I lived in Brookeville/Olney, MD for 30+ years. Baltimore is an interesting place.

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  25. vos publications sont très intéressantes!
    c'est vrai que les tulipes ainsi, le thème est plus enrichissant à développer!
    à bientôt!
    cath

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  26. Thank you, Cath. I agree that older tulips make for an interesting painting.

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  27. Love the strength of the tulip - it's really beautiful. Ah, aging...don't people our age look so old? ha ha The humor in the fisherman is great - I can hear his friends ribbing him now about that little fish :)

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  28. Thanks, Rhonda. Ah, age (a great excuse for everything).

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  29. I'm totally in love with the second drawing, the colors are just so vibrant and alive ! good job with that :D

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  30. DynamiteJ--thank you. One day, I might actually paint it; I have good intentions.

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